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In high school I had a friend who became his schools valedictorian.  We were both members of a speech club patterned after Toastmaster’s International.  One meeting Rich was scheduled to give a speech.  I remember it to this day.  It was on the subject of How to Learn Effectively.  Rich didn’t create this method but he used it with obvious success.

The method is SQ3R or Survey/Question/Read/Recite/Review.  I think this method can be adapted to be a superb plan for helping our students learn their repertoire assignments. In adapting the method for music study I slightly altered the sequence by switching the last two “R” items making it  Survey/Question/Read/Review/Recite.  SQ3R is a method guaranteed to improve learning and comprehension in our student’s music study.

I think most students just lunge into their assignment and begin slugging through their new pieces through sight reading. Another slightly more disciplined approach many students use is to first learn hands separately.  But, can this method for learning new assignments be improved upon?  I say YES!!  According to SQ3R jumping into immediately reading the piece is a mistake.  According to SQ3R “reading” is the third step of the five step plan.  Let’s review this plan and apply it to learning a musical composition.

The Overview

SQ 3R or SQRRR stands for Survey – Question – Read – Review – Recite.

SURVEY – Survey the piece for new symbols, words, dynamics, phrases, touches, repeats, fingering, possible trouble spots

QUESTION – As much as you can, study the piece and take in as much as you can without playing the piece through.  Mentally imagine playing isolated passages, for example.  And, after mentally playing through the passage, physically play through the passage.  If the piece contains thumb turns mentally imagine playing those thumb turns.  Make plans as to how to go about learning the trouble spots and then execute that plan by physically playing through it.

READ –  Read through the piece but first determine which parts you’re going to play hands separately and which parts you’re going to play hands together.  ANOTHER R to associate with reading is REPEAT.  REPEAT this step until you can play through the piece steadily and musically.

REVIEW – Once you can play through the piece steadily and musically; to bring this piece to the next level (if you so desire) begin memorizing the piece.  ANOTHER R to associate with review is RECALL.

RECITE – After the piece is well “in your fingers” and, for the most part memorized, we can take this piece to an even higher level and make it RECITAL READY.  ANOTHER R to associate with recite (for my students) is RECORD.  I ask my students to record their favorite compositions as part of their lessons.

I think by students not giving due attention to the first two steps (Survey and Question) they make the third step (Read) much more difficult than it need be.  I think if students will get in the habit of properly surveying and asking questions about their pieces, BEFORE taking their fingers to the keys and reading the piece for the first time, a goodly part of the reading issues will already he partially accomplished.  This is one of the major reasons I think SQ3R is superior to having students jump into reading the piece cold, without proper preparation.  Jumping into reading pieces immediately without due preparation is one of the reasons I think our students may get frustrated with the learning process in taking on their new compositions.

More Detail – SURVEY

In applying SQ3R to music study, I’m saying SURVEY would include those areas of a music composition would include all those items that can be learned through a quick glancing over the music.  I think it is important for the teacher to teach the student “how to survey” a piece of music.

If a composition has a repeat mark, point to the repeat mark and ask the student, “Where do we begin this repeat?”

Is the student familiar with all of the musical terms found in the composition.  The teach should define the terms.

Also include looking at the title of the composition!  If the piece is called Scherzo does the student understand the term and how that would effect the nature of his performance.  The teacher should inform the student so they have a basic understanding of the term.

Finally, at the SURVEY level the student should spot those areas that may provide technical or reading challenges.  If a student has little experience playing left hand eighth note patterns taking note of that passage would be in order.  If there are some very low bass tones the student has never played take note of them.  All this preliminary work help orient the student to the task at hand in learning this new composition.

To repeat, I think it’s very important for the teacher to impress on the student the necessity to SURVEY their composition before playing a note. This is counter to the impulse to get ones fingers running through the notes of a new piece as soon as possible.

Also, at the beginning stages of learning students are carte blanche  and need to develop the skill of learning how to SURVEY a piece of music.  It should be a part of the piano lesson for the first several years of piano study while the student gradually can do this independently from the teacher.  I would also recommend giving students a SURVEY ASSIGNMENT occasionally to check their growing ability of learning how to SURVEY their compositions.

More Detail – QUESTION

This step of SQ3R is where the student asks many QUESTIONS as to how to go about playing the piece.  This requires both mental work and physically work in playing through those isolated trouble spots one found in the SURVEY stage.

This stage is where the student takes the information gleaned from the SURVEY stage and gives it physical application.  If we take our example of learning our first Scherzo the student should give some mental thought and ask QUESTIONS as to how to create an image of playing a piece with good humor.

If the piece has some trouble spots we can isolate those passages, perhaps decide on a good fingering (mental work), and then get a start of learning that passage (physical work).  If one goes through this QUESTIONING method through each tricky passage of a composition one will be in a much better position when one finally gets to the point of playing through the complete composition.

As an example.  I recently started a new transfer student with only 4 months of previous lessons.  She wasn’t poorly taught but she was struggling with her note reading, as do many beginning students.  She already knew several scales and was beginning to learn about chords.  There was a lot of good teaching that I could build upon.  One of the first things I taught this student was “reading in steps”.  I taught her the concept of steps; notes moving from line to space.  THEN I would take a piece from her book and highlight all the step passages in yellow.  A good 85% of this particular piece was steps.  I asked the student a QUESTION. “How much of this piece is made of steps?”. The student quickly observed through my SURVEYING of the music for her that almost the complete piece was made of steps.  When the student saw that 85% of her piece was just stepping to the next note she immediately was able to play the piece with greater steadiness and security.   This is SURVEY and QUESTION at work!

Another example with the same student.  We were learning a very simple arrangement of This Land is Your Land.  This little arrangement had two repetitions of the main theme.  The second repetition had accompanying notes for the left hand.  We didn’t have a lot of experience with this type of simple harmonization so before playing a note I pointed out that this would be a “trouble spot” and something we have not experienced up to this point.  After seeing the problem we isolated those measures and I asked the students questions regarding the notes and we found the notes followed a pattern containing steps and skips.  We found this pattern happened twice, in fact.  We highlighted the left hand pattern and played it through a couple times until we had a basic understanding of the movement of the notes.  I repeated to the student the movement of the notes; a step here and a skip there.  I mentioned to the student when we play this hands together you have to remember the movement of the notes.  THEN we tried playing hands together.  She was able to get through the passage fairly well.  This is SURVEY and QUESTION at work!  It’s a frustration saver.

But again, I repeat.  At the beginning of lessons it will be largely the teacher’s job to help the student through these initial two steps of SQ3R.  In time the students will slowly, as they gain experience and knowledge, be able to take more and more responsibility themselves.

If we immediately hop to the READING step of SQ3r without these very important preliminary steps of SURVEY and QUESTION students will most likely be slugging their way through their new pieces and leading themselves into frustration.  And, in my experience frustration is one of the leading causes of potentially good students dropping their music studies.  The frustration eventually reaches “critical mass” and piano lessons just don’t become worth the effort.  SQ3R is a method that can ameliorate that constant frustration in learning new music; especially through its preliminary steps of SURVEY and QUESTION.

 

More Details – READ

If SURVEY and QUESTION is done thoroughly the READ step will come much more easily.  To save the length of this article I will not address tips on helping students with techniques to help them read music.

BUT ….. I would like to add ANOTHER R word to accompany READ.  That is REPEAT.  There will always be a need for repetition for one to gain fluency and  facility.  I think what we want to strive for is repetition that is meaningful and not meaningless.  One error is the mistake of playing a piece from beginning to end.  It is much more productive to work on more bite size units; a phrase and/or a unit (e.g. Theme One of a sonatina), than a complete composition.

Also, repeating should also have an end in mind.  To repeat a passage until a crescendo is mastered.  To repeat a passage until the voicing is executed clearly.  To repeat a passage until the tone quality is what your ear tells you is proper.

The ability to teach students to read well cannot be underestimated.  I would much rather have my students read well than labor over a couple compositions that gain them a superior rating at a music festival.  I would much rather have my students play 20 pieces nicely than 2 pieces artistically.  Of course, the ultimate goal is to have my students play 20 pieces nicely AND two pieces artistically.  BUT ….. it’s the ability to read music readily that going to be the lasting skill that will keep a student in music for a lifetime; and, for me, reading well gets the priority.

More Detail – Review

Applying SQ3R in the REVIEW step in academic work occurs after one reads the material and then goes over that same material again. This second going over the details is to cement them into ones memory. It is to maybe see if there is a macro theme to be found in this more refined reading stage of the SQ3R plan.

Applying this to music study I again add ANOTHER R to accompany REVIEW.  That word is RECALL.  One of my first teachers once told me that a musician doesn’t carry around his music in a bushel basket when he’s asked to perform.  My teacher had me buy a composition book and I had to alphabetize several pages for each letter of the alphabet.  I was to memorize my music and list these pieces alphabetically in my composition book.  After putting my memory pieces in my composition book I was to be able to play any piece listed instantly from memory.  It was a great discipline.

Unfortunately for me, this teacher quit teaching and my succeeding teachers didn’t continue this particular discipline.  But, developing our students memory skill, or their ability to RECALL, is important; especially to those students that are gifted with good memories.

Developing memory skills and giving students incentives to memorize pieces and/or develop repertoire lists is beyond the scope of this blog but memory, the ability to RECALL, is a discipline that can only benefit a music student.

More Detail – RECITE

Our final step in our SQ3R plan is RECITE.  In academic work after one READS an assignment and then REVIEWS the material so he can recall the significant points of the assigned reading; the student is asked to RECITE the assigned material and put it in his own words.

Here the students gets to the last point of academic mastery by “owning the material“; having absorbed the contents to the point of being able to, in his own words, RECITE the material.  This is learning of the highest order.  It is beyond just “recalling” the points of the assignment.

Some educators derisively call this “parroting”.  This goes to a higher level of learning that demonstrates full mastery of the material where the facts and details are totally absorbed into the student’s person.

Translating RECITE into music study I again give an ADDITIONAL R word.  That word is RECITAL.  After a student has SURVEYED his assignment and have asked good and insightful QUESTIONS about the assignment.  After the student has READ and reread the composition repeatedly.  After the student has thoroughly mastered the reading of the composition and REVIEWS it recalling its details from memory, his work still isn’t fully completed until he goes one more level.  He must now play (RECITE) the composition in recital.  The greatest level of mastery is to play in recital (for an audience); having thoroughly prepared through SURVEY-QUESTION-READ-REVIEW and finally RECITE.

My friend, Rich, who taught me SQ3R became his high schools valedictorian.  This was his method of study.  He became a successful lawyer.  I think if we apply SQ3R in our piano teaching (or creatively adapting its principles in our teaching) we will be “upping our game” in our studios and producing more masterful young pianists.

Survey/Question/Read/Review/Recite

 

 


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Freebie Friday LOGOAbout six months ago I began FREEBIE FRIDAY over at PianoTeacherPress.com  Every Friday I offer a free excerpt from one of my Piano Teacher Press products.  I was recently looking over the wide variety of products that I’ve given away and I thought it should be something more widely known to my loyal readers and your piano teaching friends.

Not only do I give away a FREE excerpt each week but I provide a short commentary on the selection explaining how it can benefit a student in your studio.  To find out what we’re offering this week please click [here] on our FREEBIE FRIDAY LINK.

Here’s a smattering of what you have been missing by not being part of our FREEBIE FRIDAY GIVEAWAY!!

BK1A_00A OUTCOVER (COLOR)If you have difficulty getting the very young preschool student to read music KEYBOARD KIDS reading method may be your answer.  Our reading method introduces one music symbol at a time in a leisurely paced manner where young students are never overwhelmed.  Suzuki teachers have found KEYBOARD KIDS as a great supplement to introduce their young students into reading music notation.  I have used it for a over quarter century and it has been a great success.  One week I offered The Cool Ghoul as a FREEBIE FRIDAY GIVEAWAY.

SAMPLE - The Cool GhoulEach symbol on this page was introduced individually before The Cool Ghoul appears in their book.  … the quarter note (walk note), the rest, the bar line, the staff line, the treble and bass clef, the time signature (only the top number is given at this stage of learning), the double bar; even the fingering and the stem direction of the notes were introduced as in individual concept.

Reading is introduced to students as STEPS and SKIPS and students are given assignment pages to cement this critical reading concept into the students thinking.  This is introduced from the very beginning.  Students are taught to underC000-COLORIZED My Very First Theory Book (Cover)stand notation where reading becomes a natural process.

To help students understand STEPS and SKIPS we have My Very First Theory Book.  This book gives students exercises to help students think in steps and skips.  One FREEBIE FRIDAY I offered a page that helps student think in steps; not through notation, but through the alphabet.FF - SAMPLE The Next Letter

NOTICE:  This page gives the student the musical alphabet where “A” follows “G”.  After students gain mental facility in learning to think ahead one (musical) alphabet letter; students are given pages to help them think one step backwards.  The same exercises are repeated for skips.

These little exercise is a very good one to help students in doing simple thought exercises in basic reasoning and is one of the ways where understanding music is very beneficial for mental development.

This book provides a very good supplemental book to the KEYBOARD KIDS series of reading books.

Another week I also used The Cool Ghoul as my Freebie Friday Giveaway but this time as part of an exercise designed to build a students rhythmic skills.  This exercise is found in our Discovery Piano System – THEORY Book 1.00-FC THEORY_Middle C - COLOR Book 1  I will speak in more detail about The Discovery Piano System in a subsequent blog about our Freebie Friday program.  In THEORY Book 1 there is a section of nearly a dozen pieces that have student and teacher play in ensemble.  One player is the pianist and the other provides a rhythmic background played on a common rhythm instrument.FF - SAMPLE The COOL Ghoul

In this example the rhythm player must play on those beats where the piano player rests, almost always on beat 2.  On the first exercises of this rhythm section of THEORY Book 1 the rhythm part emphasizes the easier skill of playing on the downbeat (beat 1).  This exercises begins to develop the skill of having the student learn to feel an offbeat.  Even though the exercises are designed around simple concepts they are designed in a progressive manner where success is most easily achieved.  Students discover musical concepts in an almost seamless stream of little steps.

As I hope you can see our FREEBIE FRIDAY Giveaways not only give you free music but they give you pedagogical information where you can use the free excerpts and maybe even give you some ideas you can use in your own studio teaching.  To join our growing list of FREEBIE FRIDAY teachers go [HERE]– find the RED BUTTON that looks like the link below (which will be red and not purple) and in your correspondence write – SUBSCRIBE FREEBIE FRIDAY. FREEBIE FRIDAY BUTTONBe on the lookout for future blogs that go over all that we’ve been giving away each FREEBIE FRIDAY!!

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Of all the blogs I’ve written the one that has generated the most controversy has been “Piano Lessons Are FUN? THINK AGAIN!!”  I would like to revisit that topic with a slightly different angle.

The angle I’d like to explore in this blog is that of “excess“.  From this angle I think you can keep Keyboard Kidsyour own definition of fun in tact.  Whenever this topic comes up it seems several people will make the point of the necessity of defining the word “fun”.  This blog will allow you to define the word “fun” however you wish.  My point will be, with whatever your definition of “fun” you use, if it is done to excess you will undermine your effectiveness as a teacher.

FIRST POINT —  As a piano teacher your primary job is to teach, to educate, NOT HAVE FUN.  When you are not giving your primary attention to your primary job your priorities are in need of adjustment.  If your FIRST QUESTION is how can I make this teaching task “more fun” I think you’re asking the wrong question.  The FIRST QUESTION should always be how can I make this teaching task make sense to the student.  Your first question reveals your first concern.  Is it to teach or to have fun?

If your first question is about teaching, about educating, the element of making the task enjoyable, or fun, will just be one element of several.  There may be other elements that need attention.  Other elements may include, “How can I make this more clear?”  “How much detail is necessary at this time for this student to understand?” “How does this student best learn information?” “Can I make this more point more effectively through a story?”  “Would an activity that would involve more student interaction be more effective?”  “Could this task be accomplished through a demonstration of some sort?”  “Would my student benefit from more repertoire helping to reinforce the point the student needs to understand?”  “Would any sort of written assignment be beneficial?”

BUT, if the first question is about fun then every task listed above is evaluated according to its fun value and not its educational value.  You may think, “Going into detail may bore him.  I can’t to that.”  “Written assignments are a drag.  No one likes doing them.”  “This student doesn’t like this kind of piece.  He may lose interest if I assign it.”

YET, if the first question is about teaching, about educating, you will answer the questions above like this, “How can I make detail work interesting to this student?”  “How can I convince this student that this piece would benefit him?”  “What would aid this student in helping him see the value of this written assignment?”

Yes, these are more difficult questions to answer, but answering these questions can lead to a more intellectually engaged student and that, in turn, will result in much higher teacher satisfaction.

If a teacher’s primary concern is education, it will lead them to better questions and therefore better answers.  However, if your primary concern is making lessons “fun” you will be preventing yourself from asking proper questions and the answers to bad questions will result in answers that will lead to unsatisfactory results.

Now lets examine the concept of how excessive emphasis on wrong values can lead to very unhealthy consequences.

salt shakerLet’s compare “fun” in teaching to additives  like “salt” or “sugar” to the foods we eat.  Looking at these additives positively, we can all agree that salt can make something palatable, edible.  How many times have we been served something that needed salt to make it palatable?  Without the salt we wouldn’t, or maybe even couldn’t, have eaten the item served to us.  In like manner, some teaching tasks need to be salted to make them palatable to the student.

HOWEVER, I think we have all found that salt isn’t the only way to make something palatable.  Broiling cod in orange juice is terrific and requires no salt at all.  Often, herbs provide a great substitute for salt.  Sprinkling some Parmesan cheese on vegetables can cut down the salt content and eliminate the need for the salt shaker.  The point, through analogy, is that “fun” isn’t the only way of making piano “palatable”.  spice rackThere are many ways of making lessons palatable and even “delicious”.  Stories. Analogies. Demonstrations. Goals.

In fact, too much salt is not good for you.  Too much salt over a period of time is a cause of many health problems including high blood pressure and poor kidney function.  In like manner, always choosing “fun” will just as assuredly cause problems in piano study, including the “addiction” to “fun” as being a necessary additive to all education.  Would we become “addicted” to potato chips if they were unsalted?  Students need a judicious variety of additives to make their piano study healthy where they do not become sick.  Too much “fun” is as problematic as too much “salt” in the long term is, in both general health and piano lessons.

Let’s look at sugar.  “Sugar” is another culprit that’s used to excess and can be analogous to thoseSugar Bowl that feel the need to “sugar” every piano lesson, every activity, with “fun”.  But, we also know that too much sugar (excess) leads to diabetes; and diabetes can lead to other maladies, including blindness and even kidney failure.  Again, I see a direct line from a preoccupation with fun to meager results (poor piano health) after years of piano lessons.  When I end a lesson by telling the student, “We had a good lessons today!”, I’m always thinking the student learned a lot in his 30 or 60 minutes; not, that the student left the lesson in good spirits because we had fun in all the activities.

Also, don’t confuse palatability with addiction (excess).  A little sweetener is completely acceptable.  The problem is confusing taste with nutrition.  Sugar doesn’t give food more nutritional value it just make it more palatable, but the excess used day after day is what causes health problems.   In like manner, an undue concern to making our lessons sweet enough so they will always be enthusiastically consumed, is wrongheaded.  Our main concern should be the “nutritional value” of our lessons with only a secondary concern given to their “palatability”, and excesses need to be curtailed, if not dropped.

But let’s realize that food outlets know our addiction to salt and sugar.  People enjoy food that is salty or sweet.  It’s easy to eat a large bag of chips because we like the salt.  We can easily eat a dozen cookies because we love the sweetness.  We have become accustomed to unhealthy levels of salt and sugar because we are not sated by a few chips or a couple cookies.  We have been told by health care workers of all stripes to avoid excesses in salt and sugar.  I think the exact same thing could be said about education with the constant emphasis on making everything fun.

How many educational products are sold because of its “fun value” where its “educational value” is just given a passing incidental mention.  That’s because “fun” sells.  In fact, publishers will print and advertise products simply for their “fun value”.  Teachers can become addicted too and think that “fun” is the way to go and think through the pedagogical products they purchase.  Products that do not convince you of their “fun value” are viewed as not totally desirable.  Fun has become, not an additive, but an addiction given to us at excessive rates, and it’s harming our long term educational effectiveness.

I do need to make one important point before closing.  I am NOT saying that we don’t advertise ourselves as making music lessons “fun”.  We all have to dutifully mention that we make piano lessons “fun”; but, I’m sure we do that as a matter of feeling the societal pressure that it’s necessary to demonstrate we are not that stereotypical curmudgeon of past generations that rapped students on the knuckles for poor technical form or for scolding students for not practicing.   I get that.  I understand.

But I do see the need for us to see the serious drawbacks that can occur if we get caught up on the “fun trap”.  A trap that gives excessive attention to the feeling that making lessons “fun” is given a mouse_trappriority that it simply does not deserve.  “Fun” must only be considered an additive to make lessons palatable and needs to be administered judiciously, because in excess, it will lead to poor lesson health.  Remember “fun” isn’t the only additive in our teaching pallet; there’s stories, analogies, demonstrations, goals, and plain friendliness and genuine interest in our students as wonderful people.  But our priority, our first concern, must be on making our lessons educationally rich where music can work its magic in our student’s lives.

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Letterhead - Valencia Studio
Piano Lessons – Mars PA

Dear Piano Lover,

I’m establishing a NEW PIANO STUDIO in Valencia, PA.  It’s in a location easily accessible to the people of Valencia, Saxonburg and Mars PA.

Most people would just love to play the piano. The reasons are many. They love the sound of the piano – they want some means to relax after a hard day at work – some just want a chance to get back the joy they had playing the piano as a child – and many parents want to give their child an opportunity for musical expression for their personal development.

I’ve been teaching piano for years and one of the most satisfying things about teaching is hearing from my old students, now adults, telling me how much playing the piano means to them. I presently have openings at my studio(s) in Wexford and Valencia to give you the opportunity to learn to play the piano.

Here’s what a former parent said of my instruction:

Mr. Severino is an excellent instructor, he teaches students on a age appropriate level. He is good at giving background history so the student is better educated in understanding how and why the music is composed. I had my child interview a number of instructors and she choose him because he made her feel the most comfortable. It has been three years and we could not be happier with her progress. Mr. Severino encourages a child’s talent and enjoyment of music. It has been a pleasure and truly rewarding experience.

Please give me a call (724) 898-0273 or eMail me at pianopressings@gmail.com to join my growing studio of great piano students.

Best,
Dan Severino

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Letterhead - Valencia Studio
Piano Lessons – Saxonburg PA

Dear Piano Lover,

I’m establishing a NEW PIANO STUDIO in Valencia, PA.  It’s in a location easily accessible to the people of Valencia, Saxonburg and Mars PA.

Most people would just love to play the piano. The reasons are many. They love the sound of the piano – they want some means to relax after a hard day at work – some just want a chance to get back the joy they had playing the piano as a child – and many parents want to give their child an opportunity for musical expression for their personal development.

I’ve been teaching piano for years and one of the most satisfying things about teaching is hearing from my old students, now adults, telling me how much playing the piano means to them. I presently have openings at my studio(s) in Wexford and Valencia to give you the opportunity to learn to play the piano.

Here’s what a former parent said of my instruction:

Mr. Severino is an excellent instructor, he teaches students on a age appropriate level. He is good at giving background history so the student is better educated in understanding how and why the music is composed. I had my child interview a number of instructors and she choose him because he made her feel the most comfortable. It has been three years and we could not be happier with her progress. Mr. Severino encourages a child’s talent and enjoyment of music. It has been a pleasure and truly rewarding experience.

Please give me a call (724) 898-0273 or eMail me at pianopressings@gmail.com to join my growing studio of great piano students.

Best,
Dan Severino

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Letterhead - Valencia Studio

Piano Lessons – Valencia, PA

Dear Piano Lover,

I’m establishing a NEW PIANO STUDIO in Valencia, PA.  It’s in a location easily accessible to the people of Valencia, Saxonburg and Mars PA.

Most people would just love to play the piano. The reasons are many. They love the sound of the piano – they want some means to relax after a hard day at work – some just want a chance to get back the joy they had playing the piano as a child – and many parents want to give their child an opportunity for musical expression for their personal development.

I’ve been teaching piano for years and one of the most satisfying things about teaching is hearing from my old students, now adults, telling me how much playing the piano means to them. I presently have openings at my studio(s) in Wexford and Valencia to give you the opportunity to learn to play the piano.

Here’s what a former parent said of my instruction:

Mr. Severino is an excellent instructor, he teaches students on a age appropriate level. He is good at giving background history so the student is better educated in understanding how and why the music is composed. I had my child interview a number of instructors and she choose him because he made her feel the most comfortable. It has been three years and we could not be happier with her progress. Mr. Severino encourages a child’s talent and enjoyment of music. It has been a pleasure and truly rewarding experience.

Please give me a call (724) 898-0273 or eMail me at pianopressings@gmail.com to join my growing studio of great piano students.

Best,
Dan Severino

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PLP Letterhead

 Piano Lessons – Mars, PA

Dear Piano Lover,

Most people would just love to play the piano. The reasons are many. They love the sound of the piano – they want some means to relax after a hard day at work – some just want a chance to get back the joy they had playing the piano as a child – and many parents want to give their child an opportunity for musical expression for their personal development.

I’ve been teaching piano for years and one of the most satisfying things about teaching is hearing from my old students, now adults, telling me how much playing the piano means to them. I presently have openings at my studio(s) in Wexford and Valencia to give you the opportunity to learn to play the piano.

Here’s what a former parent said of my instruction:

Mr. Severino is an excellent instructor, he teaches students on a age appropriate level. He is good at giving background history so the student is better educated in understanding how and why the music is composed. I had my child interview a number of instructors and she choose him because he made her feel the most comfortable. It has been three years and we could not be happier with her progress. Mr. Severino encourages a child’s talent and enjoyment of music. It has been a pleasure and truly rewarding experience.

Please give me a call (724) 935-2840 and join my growing studio of great students.

Best,
Dan Severino

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